Download Mexican American Colonization during the Nineteenth Century PDF

Mexican American Colonization during the Nineteenth Century

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Publisher : Cambridge University Press
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ISBN 13 : 9781107666245
Pages : 284 pages
Rating : 4.6/5 (17 downloads)

Download Mexican American Colonization during the Nineteenth Century PDF Format Full Free by José Angel Hernández and published by Cambridge University Press. This book was released on 2012-04-30 with total page 284 pages. Available in PDF, EPUB and Kindle. Book excerpt: This study is a reinterpretation of nineteenth century Mexican American history that examines Mexico's struggle to secure its northern border with repatriates from the United States in the aftermath of a war resulting in the loss of half its territory. Responding to past interpretations, Jose Angel Hernández suggests that these resettlement schemes centered on the developments of the frontier region, the modernization of the country with loyal Mexican American settlers, and blocking the tide of migrations to the United States to prevent the depopulation of its fractured northern border. Through an examination of Mexico's immigration and colonization policies as they developed throughout the nineteenth century, the book focuses primarily on the population of Mexican citizens who were "lost" after the end of the Mexican American War of 1846-1848 until the end of the century.


Download Mexican American Colonization During the Nineteenth Century PDF

Mexican American Colonization During the Nineteenth Century

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Publisher : Cambridge University Press
Release Date :
ISBN 13 : 1107012392
Pages : 285 pages
Rating : 4.3/5 (12 downloads)

Download Mexican American Colonization During the Nineteenth Century PDF Format Full Free by José Angel Hernández and published by Cambridge University Press. This book was released on 2012-04-30 with total page 285 pages. Available in PDF, EPUB and Kindle. Book excerpt: This study examines various cases of return migration from the United States to Mexico throughout the nineteenth century. Mexico developed a robust immigration policy after becoming an independent nation in 1821, but was unable to attract European settlers for a variety of reasons. As the United States expanded toward Mexico's northern frontiers, Mexicans in those areas now lost to the United States were subsequently seen as an ideal group to colonize and settle the fractured republic.


Download Manifest Destinies PDF

Manifest Destinies

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Publisher : NYU Press
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ISBN 13 : 0814732054
Pages : 256 pages
Rating : 4.0/5 (732 downloads)

Download Manifest Destinies PDF Format Full Free by Laura E. Gómez and published by NYU Press. This book was released on 2008-09 with total page 256 pages. Available in PDF, EPUB and Kindle. Book excerpt: Watch the Author Interview on KNME In both the historic record and the popular imagination, the story of nineteenth-century westward expansion in America has been characterized by notions of annexation rather than colonialism, of opening rather than conquering, and of settling unpopulated lands rather than displacing existing populations. Using the territory that is now New Mexico as a case study, Manifest Destinies traces the origins of Mexican Americans as a racial group in the United States, paying particular attention to shifting meanings of race and law in the nineteenth century. Laura E. Gómez explores the central paradox of Mexican American racial status as entailing the law's designation of Mexican Americans as &#;“white” and their simultaneous social position as non-white in American society. She tells a neglected story of conflict, conquest, cooperation, and competition among Mexicans, Indians, and Euro-Americans, the region’s three main populations who were the key architects and victims of the laws that dictated what one’s race was and how people would be treated by the law according to one’s race. Gómez’s path breaking work—spanning the disciplines of law, history, and sociology—reveals how the construction of Mexicans as an American racial group proved central to the larger process of restructuring the American racial order from the Mexican War (1846–48) to the early twentieth century. The emphasis on white-over-black relations during this period has obscured the significant role played by the doctrine of Manifest Destiny and the colonization of northern Mexico in the racial subordination of black Americans.


Download ETHNIC REALITIES OF MEXICAN AMERICANS PDF

ETHNIC REALITIES OF MEXICAN AMERICANS

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Publisher : Charles C Thomas Publisher
Release Date :
ISBN 13 : 0398087814
Pages : 326 pages
Rating : 4.8/5 (87 downloads)

Download ETHNIC REALITIES OF MEXICAN AMERICANS PDF Format Full Free by Martin Guevara Urbina and published by Charles C Thomas Publisher. This book was released on 2014-03-01 with total page 326 pages. Available in PDF, EPUB and Kindle. Book excerpt: The goal of this book is to examine the ethnic experience of the Mexican American community in the United States, from colonialism to twenty-first century globalization. The authors unearth evidence that reveals how historically white ideology, combined with science, law, and the American imagination, has been strategically used as a mechanism to intimidate, manipulate, oppress, control, dominate, and silence Mexican Americans, ethnic racial minorities, and poor whites. A theoretical and philosophical overview is presented, focusing on the repressive practice against Mexicans that resulted in violence, brutality, vigilantism, executions, and mass expulsions. The Mexican experience under “hooded” America is explored, including religion, the Ku Klux Klan, and the Mexican American Civil Rights Movement. Local, state, and federal laws are documented, often in conflict with one another, including the Homeland Security program that continues to result in detentions and deportations. The authors examine the continuing argument of citizenship that has been used to legally exclude Mexican children from the educational system and thereby being characterized as not fit for the classroom nor entitled to an equitable education. Segregation and integration in the classroom is discussed, featuring examples of court cases. As documented throughout the book, American law is a constant reminder of the pervasive ideology of the historical racial supremacy, socially defined and enforced ethnic inferiority, and the rejection of positive social change, equality, and justice that continues to persist in the United States. The book is extensively referenced and is intended for professionals in the fields of sociology, history, ethnic studies, Mexican American (Chicano) studies, law and political science and also those concerned with sociolegal issues. Description Here


Download An American Language PDF

An American Language

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Publisher : Univ of California Press
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ISBN 13 : 0520297067
Pages : 376 pages
Rating : 4.0/5 (297 downloads)

Download An American Language PDF Format Full Free by Rosina Lozano and published by Univ of California Press. This book was released on 2018-04-24 with total page 376 pages. Available in PDF, EPUB and Kindle. Book excerpt: An American Language is a tour de force that revolutionizes our understanding of U.S. history. It reveals the origins of Spanish as a language binding residents of the Southwest to the politics and culture of an expanding nation in the 1840s. As the West increasingly integrated into the United States over the following century, struggles over power, identity, and citizenship transformed the place of the Spanish language in the nation. An American Language is a history that reimagines what it means to be an American—with profound implications for our own time.


Download The Mexican Revolution in Chicago PDF

The Mexican Revolution in Chicago

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Publisher : University of Illinois Press
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ISBN 13 : 0252050479
Pages : 264 pages
Rating : 4.4/5 (5 downloads)

Download The Mexican Revolution in Chicago PDF Format Full Free by John H Flores and published by University of Illinois Press. This book was released on 2018-03-21 with total page 264 pages. Available in PDF, EPUB and Kindle. Book excerpt: Few realize that long before the political activism of the 1960s, there existed a broad social movement in the United States spearheaded by a generation of Mexican immigrants inspired by the revolution in their homeland. Many revolutionaries eschewed U.S. citizenship and have thus far been lost to history, though they have much to teach us about the increasingly international world of today. John H. Flores follows this revolutionary generation of Mexican immigrants and the transnational movements they created in the United States. Through a careful, detailed study of Chicagoland, the area in and around Chicago, Flores examines how competing immigrant organizations raised funds, joined labor unions and churches, engaged the Spanish-language media, and appealed in their own ways to the dignity and unity of other Mexicans. Painting portraits of liberals and radicals, who drew support from the Mexican government, and conservatives, who found a homegrown American ally in the Roman Catholic Church, Flores recovers a complex and little known political world shaped by events south of the U.S border.


Download The Deportation Machine PDF

The Deportation Machine

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Publisher : Princeton University Press
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ISBN 13 : 0691204209
Pages : 336 pages
Rating : 4.2/5 (24 downloads)

Download The Deportation Machine PDF Format Full Free by Adam Goodman and published by Princeton University Press. This book was released on 2021-09-14 with total page 336 pages. Available in PDF, EPUB and Kindle. Book excerpt: "By most accounts, the United States has deported around five million people since 1882-but this includes only what the federal government calls "formal deportations." "Voluntary departures," where undocumented immigrants who have been detained agree to leave within a specified time period, and "self-deportations," where undocumented immigrants leave because legal structures in the United States have made their lives too difficult and frightening, together constitute 90% of the undocumented immigrants who have been expelled by the federal government. This brings the number of deportees to fifty-six million. These forms of deportation rely on threats and coercion created at the federal, state, and local levels, using large-scale publicity campaigns, the fear of immigration raids, and detentions to cost-effectively push people out of the country. Here, Adam Goodman traces a comprehensive history of American deportation policies from 1882 to the present and near future. He shows that ome of the country's largest deportation operations expelled hundreds of thousands of people almost exclusively through the use of voluntary departures and through carefully-planned fear campaigns that terrified undocumented immigrants through newspaper, radio, and television publicity. These deportation efforts have disproportionately targeted Mexican immigrants, who make up half of non-citizens but 90% of deportees. Goodman examines the political economy of these deportation operations, arguing that they run on private transportation companies, corrupt public-private relations, and the creation of fear-based internal borders for long-term undocumented residents. He grounds his conclusions in over four years of research in English- and Spanish-language archives and twenty-five oral histories conducted with both immigration officials and immigrants-revealing for the first time the true magnitude and deep historical roots of anti-immigrant policy in the United Statesws that s


Download Redeeming La Raza PDF

Redeeming La Raza

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Publisher : Oxford University Press
Release Date :
ISBN 13 : 0199914141
Pages : 281 pages
Rating : 4.1/5 (914 downloads)

Download Redeeming La Raza PDF Format Full Free by Gabriela González and published by Oxford University Press. This book was released on 2018 with total page 281 pages. Available in PDF, EPUB and Kindle. Book excerpt: The economic modernization of the American Southwest and Mexico transformed the lives of ethnic Mexicans, subjecting them to economic exploitation and racism. Redeeming La Raza analyzes how political activists, using multiple strategies, challenged white supremacy, seeking to instill in ethnic Mexicans a sense of ethnic pride and unity.


Download El Norte PDF

El Norte

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Publisher : Atlantic Books
Release Date :
ISBN 13 : 1611859123
Pages : pages
Rating : 4.1/5 (859 downloads)

Download El Norte PDF Format Full Free by Carrie Gibson and published by Atlantic Books. This book was released on 2019-08-01 with total page pages. Available in PDF, EPUB and Kindle. Book excerpt: For reasons of language and history, the United States has prized its Anglo heritage above all others. However, as Carrie Gibson explains with great depth and clarity in El Norte, America has much older Spanish roots - ones that have long been unacknowledged or marginalized. The Hispanic past of the United States predates the arrival of the Pilgrims by a century and has been every bit as important in shaping the nation. El Norte chronicles the sweeping and dramatic history of Hispanic North America from the arrival of the Spanish to the present - from Ponce de Leon's initial landing in Florida in 1513 to Spanish control of the vast Louisiana territory in 1762 to the Mexican-American War in 1846 and up to the more recent tragedy of post-hurricane Puerto Rico and the ongoing border acrimony with Mexico. Interwoven in this stirring narrative of events and people are cultural issues that have been there from the start and remain unresolved: language, belonging, community, race and nationality. Seeing them play out over centuries provides vital perspective at a time when it is urgently needed. In 1883, Walt Whitman wrote 'to that composite American identity of the future, Spanish character will supply some of the most needed parts.' That future is here, and El Norte, an emotive and eventful history in its own right, will have a powerful impact on our perception of the United States.


Download Borders of Violence and Justice PDF

Borders of Violence and Justice

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Publisher : UNC Press Books
Release Date :
ISBN 13 : 1469670135
Pages : 335 pages
Rating : 4.1/5 (67 downloads)

Download Borders of Violence and Justice PDF Format Full Free by Brian D. Behnken and published by UNC Press Books. This book was released on 2022-10-07 with total page 335 pages. Available in PDF, EPUB and Kindle. Book excerpt: Brian Behnken offers a sweeping examination of the interactions between Mexican-origin people and law enforcement—both legally codified police agencies and extralegal justice—across the U.S. Southwest (especially Arizona, California, New Mexico, and Texas) from the 1830s to the 1930s. Representing a broad, colonial regime, police agencies and extralegal groups policed and controlled Mexican-origin people to maintain state and racial power in the region, treating Mexicans and Mexican Americans as a "foreign" population that they deemed suspect and undesirable. White Americans justified these perceptions and the acts of violence that they spawned with racist assumptions about the criminality of Mexican-origin people, but Behnken details the many ways Mexicans and Mexican Americans responded to violence, including the formation of self-defense groups and advocacy organizations. Others became police officers, vowing to protect Mexican-origin people from within the ranks of law enforcement. Mexican Americans also pushed state and territorial governments to professionalize law enforcement to halt abuse. The long history of the border region between the United States and Mexico has been one marked by periodic violence, but Behnken shows us in unsparing detail how Mexicans and Mexican Americans refused to stand idly by in the face of relentless assault.


Download Mexican Exodus PDF

Mexican Exodus

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Publisher : Oxford University Press
Release Date :
ISBN 13 : 0190205016
Pages : 224 pages
Rating : 4.0/5 (25 downloads)

Download Mexican Exodus PDF Format Full Free by Julia G. Young and published by Oxford University Press. This book was released on 2015-07-01 with total page 224 pages. Available in PDF, EPUB and Kindle. Book excerpt: In the summer of 1926, an army of Mexican Catholics launched a war against their government. Bearing aloft the banners of Christ the King and the Virgin of Guadalupe, they equipped themselves not only with guns, but also with scapulars, rosaries, prayers, and religious visions. These soldiers were called cristeros, and the war they fought, which would continue until the mid-1930s, is known as la Cristiada, or the Cristero war. The most intense fighting occurred in Mexico's west-central states, especially Jalisco, Guanajuato, and Michoacán. For this reason, scholars have generally regarded the war as a regional event, albeit one with national implications. Yet in fact, the Cristero war crossed the border into the United States, along with thousands of Mexican emigrants, exiles, and refugees. In Mexican Exodus, Julia Young reframes the Cristero war as a transnational conflict, using previously unexamined archival materials from both Mexico and the United States to investigate the intersections between Mexico's Cristero War and Mexican migration to the United States during the late 1920s. She traces the formation, actions, and ideologies of the Cristero diaspora--a network of Mexicans across the United States who supported the Catholic uprising from beyond the border. These Cristero supporters participated in the conflict in a variety of ways: they took part in religious ceremonies and spectacles, organized political demonstrations and marches, formed associations and organizations, and collaborated with religious and political leaders on both sides of the border. Some of them even launched militant efforts that included arms smuggling, military recruitment, espionage, and armed border revolts. Ultimately, the Cristero diaspora aimed to overturn Mexico's anticlerical government and reform the Mexican Constitution of 1917. Although the group was unable to achieve its political goals, Young argues that these emigrants--and the war itself--would have a profound and enduring resonance for Mexican emigrants, impacting community formation, political affiliations, and religious devotion throughout subsequent decades and up to the present day.


Download Blood Oranges PDF

Blood Oranges

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Publisher : Texas A&M University Press
Release Date :
ISBN 13 : 1623494141
Pages : 298 pages
Rating : 4.1/5 (494 downloads)

Download Blood Oranges PDF Format Full Free by Timothy P. Bowman and published by Texas A&M University Press. This book was released on 2016-05-20 with total page 298 pages. Available in PDF, EPUB and Kindle. Book excerpt: Blood Oranges traces the origins and legacy of racial differences between Anglo Americans and ethnic Mexicans (Mexican nationals and Mexican Americans) in the South Texas borderlands in the twentieth century. Author Tim Bowman uncovers a complex web of historical circumstances that caused ethnic Mexicans in the region to rank among the poorest, least educated, and unhealthiest demographic in the country. The key to this development, Bowman finds, was a “modern colonization movement,” a process that had its roots in the Mexican-American war of the nineteenth century but reached its culmination in the twentieth century. South Texas, in Bowman’s words, became an “internal economy just inside of the US-Mexico border.” Beginning in the twentieth century, Anglo Americans consciously transformed the region from that of a culturally “Mexican” space, with an economy based on cattle, into one dominated by commercial agriculture focused on citrus and winter vegetables. As Anglos gained political and economic control in the region, they also consolidated their power along racial lines with laws and customs not unlike the “Jim Crow” system of southern segregation. Bowman argues that the Mexican labor class was thus transformed into a marginalized racial caste, the legacy of which remained in place even as large-scale agribusiness cemented its hold on the regional economy later in the century. Blood Oranges stands to be a major contribution to the history of South Texas and borderland studies alike.


Download The Forms of Informal Empire PDF

The Forms of Informal Empire

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Publisher : JHU Press
Release Date :
ISBN 13 : 1421438089
Pages : 288 pages
Rating : 4.0/5 (438 downloads)

Download The Forms of Informal Empire PDF Format Full Free by Jessie Reeder and published by JHU Press. This book was released on 2020-06-23 with total page 288 pages. Available in PDF, EPUB and Kindle. Book excerpt: Reeder's comparative approach provides a new vision of imperial power and makes a forceful case for expanding the archive of British literary studies.


Download Archives of Dispossession PDF

Archives of Dispossession

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Publisher : UNC Press Books
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ISBN 13 : 1469633833
Pages : 186 pages
Rating : 4.8/5 (633 downloads)

Download Archives of Dispossession PDF Format Full Free by Karen R. Roybal and published by UNC Press Books. This book was released on 2017-08-08 with total page 186 pages. Available in PDF, EPUB and Kindle. Book excerpt: One method of American territory expansion in the U.S.-Mexico borderlands was the denial of property rights to Mexican landowners, which led to dispossession. Many historical accounts overlook this colonial impact on Indigenous and Mexican peoples, and existing studies that do tackle this subject tend to privilege the male experience. Here, Karen R. Roybal recenters the focus of dispossession on women, arguing that gender, sometimes more than race, dictated legal concepts of property ownership and individual autonomy. Drawing on a diverse source base—legal land records, personal letters, and literature—Roybal locates voices of Mexican American women in the Southwest to show how they fought against the erasure of their rights, both as women and as landowners. Woven throughout Roybal's analysis are these women's testimonios—their stories focusing on inheritance, property rights, and shifts in power. Roybal positions these testimonios as an alternate archive that illustrates the myriad ways in which multiple layers of dispossession—and the changes of property ownership in Mexican law—affected the formation of Mexicana identity.


Download Arredondo PDF

Arredondo

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Publisher : University of Oklahoma Press
Release Date :
ISBN 13 : 0806158239
Pages : 336 pages
Rating : 4.2/5 (158 downloads)

Download Arredondo PDF Format Full Free by Bradley Folsom and published by University of Oklahoma Press. This book was released on 2017-03-10 with total page 336 pages. Available in PDF, EPUB and Kindle. Book excerpt: In this biography of Joaquín de Arredondo, historian Bradley Folsom brings to life one of the most influential and ruthless leaders in North American history. Arredondo (1776–1837), a Bourbon loyalist who governed Texas and the other interior provinces of northeastern New Spain during the Mexican War of Independence, contended with attacks by revolutionaries, U.S. citizens, generals who had served in Napoleon’s army, pirates, and various American Indian groups, all attempting to wrest control of the region. Often resorting to violence to deal with the provinces’ problems, Arredondo was for ten years the most powerful official in northeastern New Spain. Folsom’s lively account shows the challenges of governing a vast and inhospitable region and provides insight into nineteenth-century military tactics and Spanish viceregal realpolitik. When Arredondo and his army—which included Arredondo’s protégé, future president of Mexico Antonio López de Santa Anna—arrived in Nuevo Santander in 1811, they quickly suppressed a revolutionary upheaval. Arredondo went on to expel an army of revolutionaries and invaders from the United States who had taken over Texas and declared it an independent republic. In the Battle of Medina, the bloodiest battle ever fought in Texas, he crushed the insurgents and followed his victory with a purge that reduced Texas’s population by half. Over the following eight years, Arredondo faced fresh challenges to Spanish sovereignty ranging from Comanche and Apache raids to continued American incursion. In response, Arredondo ignored his superiors and ordered his soldiers to terrorize those who disagreed with him. Arredondo’s actions had dramatic repercussions in Texas, Mexico, and the United States. His decision to allow Moses Austin to colonize Texas with Americans would culminate in the defeat of Santa Anna in 1836, but not before Santa Anna had made good use of the lessons in brutality he had learned so well from his mentor.


Download How the United States Racializes Latinos PDF

How the United States Racializes Latinos

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Publisher : Routledge
Release Date :
ISBN 13 : 1317258029
Pages : 292 pages
Rating : 4.0/5 (258 downloads)

Download How the United States Racializes Latinos PDF Format Full Free by José A. Cobas and published by Routledge. This book was released on 2015-12-03 with total page 292 pages. Available in PDF, EPUB and Kindle. Book excerpt: Mexican and Central American undocumented immigrants, as well as U.S. citizens such as Puerto Ricans and Mexican-Americans, have become a significant portion of the U.S. population. Yet the U.S. government, mainstream society, and radical activists characterize this rich diversity of peoples and cultures as one group alternatively called "Hispanics," "Latinos," or even the pejorative "Illegals." How has this racializing of populations engendered governmental policies, police profiling, economic exploitation, and even violence that afflict these groups? From a variety of settings-New York, New Jersey, Los Angeles, Central America, Cuba-this book explores this question in considering both the national and international implications of U.S. policy. Its coverage ranges from legal definitions and practices to popular stereotyping by the public and the media, covering such diverse topics as racial profiling, workplace discrimination, mob violence, treatment at border crossings, barriers to success in schools, and many more. It shows how government and social processes of racializing are too seldom understood by mainstream society, and the implication of attendant policies are sorely neglected.


Download The Monroe Doctrine PDF

The Monroe Doctrine

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Publisher : Hill and Wang
Release Date :
ISBN 13 : 1429929286
Pages : 304 pages
Rating : 4.2/5 (929 downloads)

Download The Monroe Doctrine PDF Format Full Free by Jay Sexton and published by Hill and Wang. This book was released on 2011-03-15 with total page 304 pages. Available in PDF, EPUB and Kindle. Book excerpt: A Concise History of the (In)Famous Doctrine that Gave Rise to the American Empire President James Monroe's 1823 message to Congress declaring opposition to European colonization in the Western Hemisphere became the cornerstone of nineteenth-century American statecraft. Monroe's message proclaimed anticolonial principles, yet it rapidly became the myth and means for subsequent generations of politicians to pursue expansionist foreign policies. Time and again, debates on the key issues of nineteenth- and early-twentieth-century foreign relations—expansion in the 1840s, Civil War diplomacy, the imperialism of 1898, entrance into World War I, and the establishment of the League of Nations—were framed in relation to the Monroe Doctrine. Covering more than a century of history, this engaging book explores the varying conceptions of the doctrine as its meaning evolved in relation to the needs of an expanding American empire. In Jay Sexton's adroit hands, the Monroe Doctrine provides a new lens from which to view the paradox at the center of American diplomatic history: the nation's interdependent traditions of anticolonialism and imperialism.