Download The Jewish Origins of Cultural Pluralism PDF

The Jewish Origins of Cultural Pluralism

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Publisher : Indiana University Press
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ISBN 13 : 0253223342
Pages : 278 pages
Rating : 4.3/5 (223 downloads)

Download The Jewish Origins of Cultural Pluralism PDF Format Full Free by Daniel Greene and published by Indiana University Press. This book was released on 2011 with total page 278 pages. Available in PDF, EPUB and Kindle. Book excerpt: Daniel Greene traces the emergence of the idea of cultural pluralism to the lived experiences of a group of Jewish college students and public intellectuals, including the philosopher Horace M. Kallen. These young Jews faced particular challenges as they sought to integrate themselves into the American academy and literary world of the early 20th century. At Harvard University, they founded an influential student organization known as the Menorah Association in 1906 and later the Menorah Journal, which became a leading voice of Jewish public opinion in the 1920s. In response to the idea that the American melting pot would erase all cultural differences, the Menorah Association advocated a pluralist America that would accommodate a thriving Jewish culture while bringing Jewishness into mainstream American life.


Download The Bloomsbury Companion to Jewish Studies PDF

The Bloomsbury Companion to Jewish Studies

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Publisher : A&C Black
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ISBN 13 : 1472513266
Pages : 400 pages
Rating : 4.2/5 (513 downloads)

Download The Bloomsbury Companion to Jewish Studies PDF Format Full Free by Dean Phillip Bell and published by A&C Black. This book was released on 2013-08-15 with total page 400 pages. Available in PDF, EPUB and Kindle. Book excerpt: The Bloomsbury Companion to Jewish Studies is a comprehensive reference guide, providing an overview of Jewish Studies as it has developed as an academic sub-discipline. This volume surveys the development and current state of research in the broad field of Jewish Studies - focusing on central themes, methodologies, and varieties of source materials available. It includes 11 core essays from internationally-renowned scholars and teachers that provide an important and useful overview of Jewish history and the development of Judaism, while exploring central issues in Jewish Studies that cut across historical periods and offer important opportunities to track significant themes throughout the diversity of Jewish experiences. In addition to a bibliography to help orient students and researchers, the volume includes a series of indispensable research tools, including a chronology, maps, and a glossary of key terms and concepts. This is the essential reference guide for anyone working in or exploring the rich and dynamic field of Jewish Studies.


Download Transnationalism and the Jews PDF

Transnationalism and the Jews

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Publisher : Rowman & Littlefield
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ISBN 13 : 1783481412
Pages : 190 pages
Rating : 4.4/5 (481 downloads)

Download Transnationalism and the Jews PDF Format Full Free by Jakob Egholm Feldt and published by Rowman & Littlefield. This book was released on 2016-08-30 with total page 190 pages. Available in PDF, EPUB and Kindle. Book excerpt: Links the concept of transnationalism to Jewish historical experience in order to explore Jewishness as a form of cultural-historical in-betweeness.


Download Argentine Jews in the Age of Revolt PDF

Argentine Jews in the Age of Revolt

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Publisher : BRILL
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ISBN 13 : 9004329625
Pages : 241 pages
Rating : 4.6/5 (329 downloads)

Download Argentine Jews in the Age of Revolt PDF Format Full Free by Beatrice D. Gurwitz and published by BRILL. This book was released on 2016-11-21 with total page 241 pages. Available in PDF, EPUB and Kindle. Book excerpt: Argentine Jews in the Age of Revolt traces the ongoing efforts among Argentine Jews to rethink the Argentine nation, Jewish membership in it, and the nature of Jewishness itself through the revolutionary ferment of the 1960s and 1970s.


Download American Jewry and the Re-Invention of the East European Jewish Past PDF

American Jewry and the Re-Invention of the East European Jewish Past

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Publisher : Walter de Gruyter GmbH & Co KG
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ISBN 13 : 3110499436
Pages : 304 pages
Rating : 4.4/5 (499 downloads)

Download American Jewry and the Re-Invention of the East European Jewish Past PDF Format Full Free by Markus Krah and published by Walter de Gruyter GmbH & Co KG. This book was released on 2017-11-20 with total page 304 pages. Available in PDF, EPUB and Kindle. Book excerpt: The postwar decades were not the “golden era” in which American Jews easily partook in the religious revival, liberal consensus, and suburban middle-class comfort. Rather it was a period marked by restlessness and insecurity born of the shock about the Holocaust and of the unprecedented opportunities in American society. American Jews responded to loss and opportunity by obsessively engaging with the East European past. The proliferation of religious texts on traditional spirituality, translations of Yiddish literature, historical essays , photographs and documents of shtetl culture, theatrical and musical events, culminating in the Broadway musical Fiddler on the Roof, illustrate the grip of this past on post-1945 American Jews. This study shows how American Jews reimagined their East European past to make it usable for their American present. By rewriting their East European history, they created a repertoire of images, stories, and ideas that have shaped American Jewry to this day.


Download What Are Jews For? PDF

What Are Jews For?

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Publisher : Princeton University Press
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ISBN 13 : 0691201935
Pages : 376 pages
Rating : 4.9/5 (21 downloads)

Download What Are Jews For? PDF Format Full Free by Adam Sutcliffe and published by Princeton University Press. This book was released on 2020-06-16 with total page 376 pages. Available in PDF, EPUB and Kindle. Book excerpt: A wide-ranging look at the history of Western thinking since the seventeenth century on the purpose of the Jewish people in the past, present, and future What is the purpose of Jews in the world? The Bible singles out the Jews as God’s “chosen people,” but the significance of this special status has been understood in many different ways over the centuries. What Are Jews For? traces the history of the idea of Jewish purpose from its ancient and medieval foundations to the modern era, showing how it has been central to Western thinking on the meanings of peoplehood for everybody. Adam Sutcliffe delves into the links between Jewish and Christian messianism and the association of Jews with universalist and transformative ideals in modern philosophy, politics, literature, and social thought. The Jews have been accorded a crucial role in both Jewish and Christian conceptions of the end of history, when they will usher the world into a new epoch of unity and harmony. Since the seventeenth century this messianic underlay to the idea of Jewish purpose has been repeatedly reconfigured in new forms. From the political theology of the early modern era to almost all domains of modern thought—religious, social, economic, nationalist, radical, assimilationist, satirical, and psychoanalytical—Jews have retained a close association with positive transformation for all. Sutcliffe reveals the persistent importance of the “Jewish Purpose Question” in the attempts of Jews and non-Jews alike to connect the collective purpose of particular communities to the broader betterment of humanity. Shedding light on questions of exceptionalism, pluralism, and universalism, What Are Jews For? explores an intricate question that remains widely resonant in contemporary culture and political debate.


Download Understanding Religious Pluralism PDF

Understanding Religious Pluralism

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Publisher : Wipf and Stock Publishers
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ISBN 13 : 1630874892
Pages : 336 pages
Rating : 4.8/5 (874 downloads)

Download Understanding Religious Pluralism PDF Format Full Free by Peter C. Phan and published by Wipf and Stock Publishers. This book was released on 2014-08-01 with total page 336 pages. Available in PDF, EPUB and Kindle. Book excerpt: Our contemporary world is fast becoming religiously diverse in a variety of ways. Thanks to globalization and migration, to mention only two current worldwide trends, people of diverse and sometimes mutually hostile faiths are now sharing neighborhoods and encountering one another's religious traditions on a daily basis. For scholars in religious studies and theology the issue to be examined is whether religious diversity is merely the result of historical development and social interaction, or whether it is inherent in the object of belief--part of the very structure of faith and our attempts to understand and express it. The essays in this volume range from explorations of the impact of religious diversity on religious studies to examples of interfaith encounter and dialogue, and current debates on Christian theology of religion. These essays examine not only the theoretical issues posed by religious pluralism to the study of religion and Christian theology but also concrete cases in which religious pluralism has been a bone of contention. Together, they open up new vistas for further conversation on the nature and development of religious pluralism.


Download Central European Jewish Émigrés and the Shaping of Postwar Culture: Studies in Memory of Lilian Furst (1931-2009) PDF

Central European Jewish Émigrés and the Shaping of Postwar Culture: Studies in Memory of Lilian Furst (1931-2009)

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Publisher : MDPI
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ISBN 13 : 3906980561
Pages : 303 pages
Rating : 4.5/5 (98 downloads)

Download Central European Jewish Émigrés and the Shaping of Postwar Culture: Studies in Memory of Lilian Furst (1931-2009) PDF Format Full Free by Julie Mell and published by MDPI. This book was released on 2018-10-08 with total page 303 pages. Available in PDF, EPUB and Kindle. Book excerpt: This book is a printed edition of the Special Issue "Between Religion and Ethnicity: Twentieth-Century Jewish Émigrés and the Shaping of Postwar Culture" that was published in Religions


Download The Oxford Handbook of the Jewish Diaspora PDF

The Oxford Handbook of the Jewish Diaspora

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Publisher : Oxford University Press
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ISBN 13 : 0197554814
Pages : 640 pages
Rating : 4.8/5 (554 downloads)

Download The Oxford Handbook of the Jewish Diaspora PDF Format Full Free by Hasia R. Diner and published by Oxford University Press. This book was released on 2021-10-27 with total page 640 pages. Available in PDF, EPUB and Kindle. Book excerpt: For as long as historians have contemplated the Jewish past, they have engaged with the idea of diaspora. Dedicated to the study of transnational peoples and the linkages these people forged among themselves over the course of their wanderings and in the multiple places to which they went, the term "diaspora" reflects the increasing interest in migrations, trauma, globalism, and community formations. The Oxford Handbook of the Jewish Diaspora acts as a comprehensive collection of scholarship that reflects the multifaceted nature of diaspora studies. Persecuted and exiled throughout their history, the Jewish people have also left familiar places to find better opportunities in new ones. But their history has consistently been defined by their permanent lack of belonging. This Oxford Handbook explores the complicated nature of diasporic Jewish life as something both destructive and generative. Contributors explore subjects as diverse as biblical and medieval representations of diaspora, the various diaspora communities that emerged across the globe, the contradictory relationship the diaspora bears to Israel, and how the diaspora is celebrated and debated within modern Jewish thought. What these essays share is a commitment to untangling the legacy of the diaspora on Jewish life and culture. This volume portrays the Jewish diaspora not as a simple, unified front, but as a population characterized by conflicting impulses and ideas. The Oxford Handbook of the Jewish Diaspora captures the complexity of the Jewish diaspora by acknowledging the tensions inherent in a group of people defined by trauma and exile as well as by voluntary migrations to places with greater opportunity.


Download Jews and the Mediterranean PDF

Jews and the Mediterranean

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Publisher : Indiana University Press
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ISBN 13 : 0253048001
Pages : 237 pages
Rating : 4.0/5 (48 downloads)

Download Jews and the Mediterranean PDF Format Full Free by Matthias B. Lehmann and published by Indiana University Press. This book was released on 2020-06-02 with total page 237 pages. Available in PDF, EPUB and Kindle. Book excerpt: A selection of essays examining the significance of what Jewish history and Mediterranean studies contribute to our knowledge of the other. Jews and the Mediterranean considers the historical potency and uniqueness of what happens when Sephardi, Mizrahi, and Ashkenazi Jews meet in the Mediterranean region. By focusing on the specificity of the Jewish experience, the essays gathered in this volume emphasize human agency and culture over the length of Mediterranean history. This collection draws attention to what made Jewish people distinctive and warns against facile notions of Mediterranean connectivity, diversity, fluidity, and hybridity, presenting a new assessment of the Jewish experience in the Mediterranean.


Download New Perspectives on Jewish Cultural History PDF

New Perspectives on Jewish Cultural History

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Publisher : Routledge
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ISBN 13 : 1000477959
Pages : 226 pages
Rating : 4.9/5 (477 downloads)

Download New Perspectives on Jewish Cultural History PDF Format Full Free by Maja Gildin Zuckerman and published by Routledge. This book was released on 2019-08-19 with total page 226 pages. Available in PDF, EPUB and Kindle. Book excerpt: This book presents original studies of how a cultural concept of Jewishness and a coherent Jewish history came to make sense in the experiences of people entangled in different historical situations. Instead of searching for the inconsistencies, discontinuities, or ruptures of dominant grand historical narratives of Jewish cultural history, this book unfolds situations and events, where Jewishness and a coherent Jewish history became useful, meaningful, and acted upon as a site of causal explanations. Inspired by classical American pragmatism and more recent French pragmatism, we present a new perspective on Jewish cultural history in which the experiences, problems, and actions of people are at the center of reconstructions of historical causalities and projections of future horizons. The book shows how boundaries between Jewish and non-Jewish are not a priori given but are instead repeatedly experienced in a variety of situations and then acted upon as matters of facts. In different ways and on different scales, these studies show how people's experiences of Jewishness perpetually probe, test, and shape the boundaries between what is Jewish and non-Jewish, and that these boundaries shape the spatiotemporal linkages that we call history.


Download 犹太史研究入门 PDF

犹太史研究入门

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Publisher : BEIJING BOOK CO. INC.
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ISBN 13 :
Pages : 410 pages
Rating : 4./5 ( downloads)

Download 犹太史研究入门 PDF Format Full Free by 张倩红 and published by BEIJING BOOK CO. INC.. This book was released on 2021-11-02 with total page 410 pages. Available in PDF, EPUB and Kindle. Book excerpt: 本书介绍了犹太史研究的各个方面,除了概述犹太历史的基本框架、介绍犹太史的原始文献外,还对研究发展史和主要成果进行了梳理,并展现了当前犹太史研究中的重点问题。


Download Place in Modern Jewish Culture and Society PDF

Place in Modern Jewish Culture and Society

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Publisher : Oxford University Press
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ISBN 13 : 0190912642
Pages : 400 pages
Rating : 4.6/5 (912 downloads)

Download Place in Modern Jewish Culture and Society PDF Format Full Free by Richard I. Cohen and published by Oxford University Press. This book was released on 2018-07-12 with total page 400 pages. Available in PDF, EPUB and Kindle. Book excerpt: Notions of place have always permeated Jewish life and consciousness. The Babylonian Talmud was pitted against the Jerusalem Talmud; the worlds of Sepharad and Ashkenaz were viewed as two pillars of the Jewish experience; the diaspora was conceived as a wholly different experience from that of Eretz Israel; and Jews from Eastern Europe and "German Jews" were often seen as mirror opposites, whereas Jews under Islam were often characterized pejoratively, especially because of their allegedly uncultured surroundings. Place, or makom, is a strategic opportunity to explore the tensions that characterize Jewish culture in modernity, between the sacred and the secular, the local and the global, the historical and the virtual, Jewish culture and others. The plasticity of the term includes particular geographic places and their cultural landscapes, theological allusions, and an array of other symbolic relations between locus, location, and the production of culture. The 30th volume of Studies in Contemporary Jewry includes twelve essays that deal with various aspects of particular places, making each location a focal point for understanding Jewish life and culture. Scholars from the United States, Europe, and Israel have used their disciplinary skills to shed light on the vicissitudes of the 20th century in relation to place and Jewish culture. Their essays continue the ongoing discussion in this realm and provide further insights into the historiographical turn in Jewish studies.


Download Jews on the Move: Modern Cosmopolitanist Thought and its Others PDF

Jews on the Move: Modern Cosmopolitanist Thought and its Others

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Publisher : Routledge
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ISBN 13 : 1351370480
Pages : 216 pages
Rating : 4.4/5 (37 downloads)

Download Jews on the Move: Modern Cosmopolitanist Thought and its Others PDF Format Full Free by Cathy Gelbin and published by Routledge. This book was released on 2019-12-20 with total page 216 pages. Available in PDF, EPUB and Kindle. Book excerpt: Jewish cosmopolitanism is key to understanding both modern globalization, and the old and new nationalism. Jewish cultures existing in the Western world during the last two centuries have been and continue to be read as hyphenated phenomena within a specific national context, such as German-Jewish or American-Jewish culture. Yet to what extent do such nationalized constructs of Jewish culture and identity still dominate Jewish self-expressions, and the discourses about them, in the rapidly globalizing world of the twenty-first century? In a world in which Diaspora societies have begun to reshape themselves as part of a super- or nonnational identity, what has happened to a cosmopolitan Jewish identity? In a post-Zionist world, where one of the newest and most substantial Diaspora communities is that of Israelis, in the new globalized culture, is “being Jewish” suddenly something that can reach beyond the older models of Diasporic integration or nationalism? Which new paradigms of Jewish self-location, within the evolving and conflicting global discourses, about the nation, race, Genocides, anti-Semitism, colonialism and postcolonialism, gender and sexual identities does the globalization of Jewish cultures open up? To what extent might transnational notions of Jewishness, such as European-Jewish identity, create new discursive margins and centers? Is there a possibility that a “virtual makom (Jewish space)” might constitute itself? Recent studies on cosmopolitanism cite the Jewish experience as a key to the very notion of the movement of people for good or for ill as well as for the resurgence of modern nationalism. These theories reflect newer models of postcolonialism and transnationalism in regard to global Jewish cultures. The present volume spans the widest reading of Jewish cosmopolitisms to study “Jews on the move.” This book was originally published as a special issue of the European Review of History.


Download Education for Cultural Pluralism: Papers from a Conference Held in London, December 15-17, 1970, Under the Auspices of the Cultural Department, World Jewish Congress, as a Contribution to United Nations International Education Year PDF Format Full Free by Emanuel Montague Eppel and published by . This book was released on 1972 with total page 148 pages. Available in PDF, EPUB and Kindle. Book excerpt:


Download Jews and Jazz PDF

Jews and Jazz

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Publisher : Taylor & Francis
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ISBN 13 : 1317270398
Pages : 196 pages
Rating : 4.3/5 (27 downloads)

Download Jews and Jazz PDF Format Full Free by Charles B Hersch and published by Taylor & Francis. This book was released on 2016-10-14 with total page 196 pages. Available in PDF, EPUB and Kindle. Book excerpt: Jews and Jazz: Improvising Ethnicity explores the meaning of Jewish involvement in the world of American jazz. It focuses on the ways prominent jazz musicians like Stan Getz, Benny Goodman, Artie Shaw, Lee Konitz, Dave Liebman, Michael Brecker, and Red Rodney have engaged with jazz in order to explore and construct ethnic identities. The author looks at Jewish identity through jazz in the context of the surrounding American culture, believing that American Jews have used jazz to construct three kinds of identities: to become more American, to emphasize their minority outsider status, and to become more Jewish. From the beginning, Jewish musicians have used jazz for all three of these purposes, but the emphasis has shifted over time. In the 1920s and 1930s, when Jews were seen as foreign, Jews used jazz to make a more inclusive America, for themselves and for blacks, establishing their American identity. Beginning in the 1940s, as Jews became more accepted into the mainstream, they used jazz to "re-minoritize" and avoid over-assimilation through identification with African Americans. Finally, starting in the 1960s as ethnic assertion became more predominant in America, Jews have used jazz to explore and advance their identities as Jews in a multicultural society.


Download Yiddish Paris PDF

Yiddish Paris

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Publisher : Indiana University Press
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ISBN 13 : 025305981X
Pages : 268 pages
Rating : 4.8/5 (59 downloads)

Download Yiddish Paris PDF Format Full Free by Nick Underwood and published by Indiana University Press. This book was released on 2022-03 with total page 268 pages. Available in PDF, EPUB and Kindle. Book excerpt: Yiddish Paris explores how Yiddish-speaking emigrants from Eastern Europe in Paris in the 1920s and 1930s created a Yiddish diaspora nation in Western Europe and how they presented that nation to themselves and to others in France. In this meticulously researched and first full-length study of interwar Yiddish culture in France, author Nicholas Underwood argues that the emergence of a Yiddish Paris was depended on "culture makers," mostly left-wing Jews from Socialist and Communist backgrounds who created cultural and scholarly organizations and institutions, including the French branch of YIVO (a research institution focused on East European Jews), theater troupes, choruses, and a pavilion at the Paris World's Fair of 1937. Yiddish Paris examines how these left-wing Yiddish-speaking Jews insisted that even in France, a country known for demanding the assimilation of immigrant and minority groups, they could remain a distinct group, part of a transnational Yiddish-speaking Jewish nation. Yet, in the process, they in fact created a French-inflected version of Jewish diaspora nationalism, finding allies among French intellectuals, largely on the left.